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When politicians want to “Open Carry”

15 Aug

hiroshima nagasaki

I know what the big guys told the country back then … but what about the not-quite-as-big who had more direct experience with the use of lethal force?

What did they think about it?

This is well worth and recommended reading.

The problem with political hawks is that the temptation to shoot first and ponder the act afterwards is greater… and not the same thing as shooting first in an actual combat moment when to shoot second is to possibly never shoot again.

“Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives. But most of the top American military officials at the time said otherwise.”

The Real Reason America Dropped the Bomb on Japan – trueactivist.com

“Admiral William Leahy – the highest ranking member of the U.S. military from 1942 until retiring in 1949, who was the first de facto Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and who was at the center of all major American military decisions in World War II – wrote (pg. 441):

It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender because of the effective sea blockade and the successful bombing with conventional weapons.

The lethal possibilities of atomic warfare in the future are frightening. My own feeling was that in being the first to use it, we had adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages. I was not taught to make war in that fashion, and wars cannot be won by destroying women and children.”

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3 responses to “When politicians want to “Open Carry”

  1. Michael Snow

    August 17, 2015 at 12:06 pm

    And Eisenhower: August 6, 1945, 70th Anniversary Hiroshima
    July 21, 1945: Secretary of War met several top U.S. generals in Germany. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower would years later in Newsweek write: “Secretary of War Stimson, visiting my headquarters in Germany, informed me that our government was preparing to drop an atomic bomb on Japan. I was one of those who felt that there were a number of cogent reasons to question the wisdom of such an act. …the Secretary, upon giving me the news of the successful bomb test in New Mexico, and of the plan for using it, asked for my reaction, apparently expecting a vigorous assent. During his recitation of the relevant facts, I had been conscious of a feeling of depression and so I voiced to him my grave misgivings, first on the basis of my belief that Japan was already defeated and that dropping the bomb was completely unnecessary, and secondly because I thought that our country should avoid shocking world opinion by the use of a weapon whose employment was, I thought, no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives.

    “It was my belief that Japan was, at that very moment, seeking some way to surrender with a minimum loss of ‘face’. The Secretary was deeply perturbed by my attitude.”

     
    • Arthur Ruger

      August 17, 2015 at 5:18 pm

      Thanks

       
  2. Michael Snow

    August 17, 2015 at 12:07 pm

    Reblogged this on ZEITGEIST.

     

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